Photo
1 day ago
letmypeopleshow:

The origin of the universe @robpruitt5000 #robpruitt #GavinBrownsenterprise (at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise)

letmypeopleshow:

The origin of the universe @robpruitt5000 #robpruitt #GavinBrownsenterprise (at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise)

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Video
2 days ago


letmypeopleshow:

Behold the Mighty Fantastical Cathedrals and Delirious Megalopolises of French Street Sweeper and Self-Taught Artist Marcel Storr

Thirty-eight years after his death, self-taught artist Marcel Storr, a French street sweeper who was unknown in his lifetime and didn’t conceive of his fantastical renderings of churches and cityscapes as art, is getting his first U.S. gallery show.

Marcel Storr: Reimagining Paris,” at Andrew Edlin in Chelsea through October 25, uses lightboxes to showcase the artist’s intricate pencil drawings of church spires, ziggurat-like forms, and urban vistas, which he covered with ink in otherworldly hues.

“Combining Late Gothic detail with contemporary scale, 12th-century ornamentation with 1930s foliate decoration, medieval and psychedelic colors, organic and crystalline forms, Storr’s imposing high-rises fully embrace the heroics (if not the rationalist aesthetics of Modernism,” Anne Doran writes in the exhibition catalogue.

Storr believed that Paris would one day be destroyed in a nuclear attack and that the President of the United States would need his drawings to rebuild the French capital.

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Photo
5 days ago
letmypeopleshow:

Get Your Vintage Guerrilla Girls Posters, Still as Relevant as Ever
Legendary artist and Franklin Furnace founding director Martha Wilson with vintage posters from the feminist data-cruching anonymous gorilla-mask wearing activist group, the Guerrilla Girls, at the New York Art Book Fair. Available for prices ranging from $20 to $500, the classic posters—made between 1985 and ‘91—aren’t as outdated as they should be at this point. 

letmypeopleshow:

Get Your Vintage Guerrilla Girls Posters, Still as Relevant as Ever

Legendary artist and Franklin Furnace founding director Martha Wilson with vintage posters from the feminist data-cruching anonymous gorilla-mask wearing activist group, the Guerrilla Girls, at the New York Art Book Fair. Available for prices ranging from $20 to $500, the classic posters—made between 1985 and ‘91—aren’t as outdated as they should be at this point

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Video
5 days ago


letmypeopleshow:

Morris Louis’s Monumental Gravity-Defying Rainbow Canvases

To make his series “Veils,” in the mid and late ’50s, the great Color Field painter Morris Louis poured Magna acrylic thinned with turpentine onto unprimed, unstretched canvases. Check out these massive paintings, on view at Mnuchin gallery—and look closely at the top of each canvas, where stains in single hues reveal the complex choreography the artist used to create his layered masterworks. 

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Video
6 days ago


letmypeopleshow:

Ultra violet: Felt on felt by William J. O’Brien is in “Thread Lines,” a show exploring the affinities between textiles and drawings at the Drawing Center

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Video
4 weeks ago


letmypeopleshow:

Jewish Museum Show Spotlights 2 Abstract Expressionist Masters Who Were Left Out of Spotlight (Maybe Because They Were Black and Female?)

She was born in 1908 to Russian parents was raised in Brooklyn.

He was born in 1909 to immigrants from Bermuda, and grew up in Harlem.

Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis both studied art in New York, explored Social Realism in their work with the Federal Art Project, and refined their personal abstract language in the ’40s and ’50s. They both developed signature styles that summon classic elements of Abstract Expressionism, playing with gesture and color and line that almost resolves into writing. And both had shows in prestigious New York galleries.

But the two artists, the black man and the Jewish woman best known as Jackson Pollock’s wife, shared another quality: few people wrote about their work.

“A noticeable lack of critical reception” is how Norman Kleeblatt, chief curator at the Jewish Museum, puts it in the catalogue for “From the Margins,” an exhibition featuring paintings the two artists made between 1945 and ‘52.

The show, opening September 12, creates a suggestive painterly conversation, at times articulated in the rhythms of early Modernism, Hebrew and bebop.

And it reminds us that the story of Abstract Expressionism is still being written. 

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Video
2 months ago


letmypeopleshow:

How many ways can you capture the midtown skyscape through Spencer Finch’s rainbow-colored filters? 

Commissioned by the Morgan Library & Museum to create a work for its four-story Gilbert Court, Spencer Finch took his inspiration from medieval prayer books. He applied films of color to the windows, dangling panes that transform Renzo Piano’s glass-and-steel courtyard into a hall of multicolored mirrors. The configuration and color palette will change with the seasons. 

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Video
2 months ago

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Video
2 months ago


letmypeopleshow:

Take a walk on the tiled side: Katrín Sigurdardóttir’s spectacular Sculpture Center floor

A fairytale Baroque pavilion was the concept Katrín Sigurdardóttir had in mind for the ornate sea of tiles she calls Foundation.

She made the first version of her spectacular floating platform in Venice, in the old laundries of the Palazzo Zenobio, for the Iceland pavilion of last year’s Biennale. Now she has reconfigured it for the last stop in its tour, the former trolley repair facility that houses the Sculpture Center in Long Island City, Queens.

There, its profusion of ornament summons visions of palaces and trade routes and the armies of artisans who maneuvered its intricate puzzle pieces in place. Feel free to walk on it, or maybe dance.

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