Video
2 days ago


letmypeopleshow:

Haunting houses: Ulf Puder’s paintings of abandoned buildings are like the end of the world, colorized

The East German painter’s show of recent oil paintings opens at Marc Straus on the Lower East Side on October 26.

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Video
1 week ago


letmypeopleshow:

Marisol’s Poignant, Politically Charged Pop Portraits Finally in Spotlight at Museo del Barrio and Metropolitan Museum of Art  

I can’t wait to see Pop provocateur Marisol’s life-size self-portrait at the Met, being watched as she watches her 3-D version of Leonardo’s Last Supper. Talk about the artist being present. 

I used to see Marisol, who is now in her mid-80s, at gallery openings around New York. This was after her wave of ’60s fame as a rising star at Castelli and Documenta and as an intimate, and artistic subject, of Warhol. Women’s magazines celebrated the Paris-born beauty—whose family was Venezuelan—as the “Latin Garbo.”

Over the decades, Marisol’s visibility decreased, for reasons including her gender, ethnicity, and the edginess of her works, which seduced with their ramshackle wit even as they disturbed with their provocative approaches to race, religion, politics, and sex. Scholars found her sculpture inconvenient to classify. 

By 2000, as Boston Globe critic Sebastian Smee puts it, Marisol “had been essentially erased from the history of postwar art.”

He was celebrating the long-awaited retrospective that opened last summer at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, part of a gradual Marisol revival that is bringing this underrated artist back to the spotlight. 

Last week, her astonishing renderings of figures—Pocahantas, John-John Kennedy, The Holy Family, Magritte, Horace Poolaw, and herself, to name some—arrived at New York’s El Museo del Barrio, part of the survey of 30 sculptures and works on paper.

Meanwhile, the Metropolitan Museum of Art has just installed Self-Portrait Looking at The Last Supper (1982-84), Marisol’s spectacular 3-D translation of Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece, perspective intact, into a life-size tableau.

It is a bittersweet moment for curator Marina Pacini, who worked on the retrospective for a decade. The artist still lives in New York, but she was not able to attend the exhibitions.

Check out this excellent guide to Marisol’s work and join the Marisol revival at #meetmarisol.  

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1 week ago


letmypeopleshow:

See How James Turrell Translated his Guggenheim Light-Art Spectacle Into Three Luminous Ukiyo-e Woodcuts

How do you make prints that convey the thingness of light?

This was the challenge confronting James Turrell when he started a print series based on Aten Reign, his spectacular chromatic installation in the Guggenheim’s atrium last year.

The result, a series of luminous Ukiyo-e prints, is now on view at Pace Prints on 57th Street.

To make the prints, his first woodcuts, Turrell collaborated with master printer Yasu Shibata, with assistance from Justin Israels at the Pace Editions Ink Workshop. The process started with photographs, shot by Turrell as the colored ellipses of light in Aten Reign shifted with the time of day. Next he matched each color to a feeling, which the team conveyed using 14 colors, 12 woodblocks, and one metal plate. Six blocks and six proofs are part of the show, along with the three luminous woodcuts in Suite from Aten Reign.

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Video
2 weeks ago


letmypeopleshow:

Don’t these enchanting bird paintings by Bill Lynch make you want to sing? 

Details of paintings by Bill Lynch at White Columns on a bittersweet occasion: It’s the first New York show for the artist, who suffered from schizophrenia and died at 54 last year. The exhibition was organized by Lynch’s friend and classmate, the painter Verne Dawson

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2 weeks ago


letmypeopleshow:

The Devil Never Even Lived in James Siena’s Mesmerizing Typewriter Palindrome Drawings

The artist James Siena has long collected antique typewriters. One day last year, he started typing his art. 

With the delicate precision of a concert pianist, he tapped out letters, numbers, and punctuation in colored ink to produce eye-teasing abstractions.

This being James Siena, he had a system, so each of his cryptic texts came out reading the the same way forward and back. Reminiscent of medieval micrography, these delirious palindromes illuminate the interior poetry of math. 

They’re on view for the first time in a new show at Sargent’s Daughters, which pairs them with Orly Genger’s madcap drawings of abstracted superhero limbs.

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Photo
2 weeks ago
letmypeopleshow:

The origin of the universe @robpruitt5000 #robpruitt #GavinBrownsenterprise (at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise)

letmypeopleshow:

The origin of the universe @robpruitt5000 #robpruitt #GavinBrownsenterprise (at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise)

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2 weeks ago


letmypeopleshow:

Behold the Mighty Fantastical Cathedrals and Delirious Megalopolises of French Street Sweeper and Self-Taught Artist Marcel Storr

Thirty-eight years after his death, self-taught artist Marcel Storr, a French street sweeper who was unknown in his lifetime and didn’t conceive of his fantastical renderings of churches and cityscapes as art, is getting his first U.S. gallery show.

Marcel Storr: Reimagining Paris,” at Andrew Edlin in Chelsea through October 25, uses lightboxes to showcase the artist’s intricate pencil drawings of church spires, ziggurat-like forms, and urban vistas, which he covered with ink in otherworldly hues.

“Combining Late Gothic detail with contemporary scale, 12th-century ornamentation with 1930s foliate decoration, medieval and psychedelic colors, organic and crystalline forms, Storr’s imposing high-rises fully embrace the heroics (if not the rationalist aesthetics of Modernism,” Anne Doran writes in the exhibition catalogue.

Storr believed that Paris would one day be destroyed in a nuclear attack and that the President of the United States would need his drawings to rebuild the French capital.

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3 weeks ago
letmypeopleshow:

Get Your Vintage Guerrilla Girls Posters, Still as Relevant as Ever
Legendary artist and Franklin Furnace founding director Martha Wilson with vintage posters from the feminist data-cruching anonymous gorilla-mask wearing activist group, the Guerrilla Girls, at the New York Art Book Fair. Available for prices ranging from $20 to $500, the classic posters—made between 1985 and ‘91—aren’t as outdated as they should be at this point. 

letmypeopleshow:

Get Your Vintage Guerrilla Girls Posters, Still as Relevant as Ever

Legendary artist and Franklin Furnace founding director Martha Wilson with vintage posters from the feminist data-cruching anonymous gorilla-mask wearing activist group, the Guerrilla Girls, at the New York Art Book Fair. Available for prices ranging from $20 to $500, the classic posters—made between 1985 and ‘91—aren’t as outdated as they should be at this point

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Video
3 weeks ago


letmypeopleshow:

Morris Louis’s Monumental Gravity-Defying Rainbow Canvases

To make his series “Veils,” in the mid and late ’50s, the great Color Field painter Morris Louis poured Magna acrylic thinned with turpentine onto unprimed, unstretched canvases. Check out these massive paintings, on view at Mnuchin gallery—and look closely at the top of each canvas, where stains in single hues reveal the complex choreography the artist used to create his layered masterworks. 

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Video
3 weeks ago


letmypeopleshow:

Ultra violet: Felt on felt by William J. O’Brien is in “Thread Lines,” a show exploring the affinities between textiles and drawings at the Drawing Center

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