Here’s Our Fence Post:
Riffing off of Robert Barry’s 1969 show at Sperone gallery in Turin—which consisted of a sign announcing that the gallery was closed—Chilean-born artist Iván Navarro has caused a buzz at New York’s Armory show with an enormous neon fence on the site where his gallery, Paul Kasmin, would normally have its stand. In a venue where space is at a premium, the blocked-off area is perhaps the most exclusive site at the fair, a place no one can get in—unless, of course, you buy the piece, in which case you can presumably use it as a playpen or for any other purpose. The full fence costs $360,000, according to the gallery, but buyers can also pick up 7-foot sections for $40,000 each. Meanwhile, there are more of Navarro’s neon light sculptures—spectacular plays of mirrors and light that are modeled on the plans of skyscrapers and appear to extend to infinity—at his solo show in Kasmin’s Chelsea space, which opened last night.   

Here’s Our Fence Post:

Riffing off of Robert Barry’s 1969 show at Sperone gallery in Turin—which consisted of a sign announcing that the gallery was closed—Chilean-born artist Iván Navarro has caused a buzz at New York’s Armory show with an enormous neon fence on the site where his gallery, Paul Kasmin, would normally have its stand. In a venue where space is at a premium, the blocked-off area is perhaps the most exclusive site at the fair, a place no one can get in—unless, of course, you buy the piece, in which case you can presumably use it as a playpen or for any other purpose. The full fence costs $360,000, according to the gallery, but buyers can also pick up 7-foot sections for $40,000 each. Meanwhile, there are more of Navarro’s neon light sculptures—spectacular plays of mirrors and light that are modeled on the plans of skyscrapers and appear to extend to infinity—at his solo show in Kasmin’s Chelsea space, which opened last night.   

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