Antelope Play: 
When the Bamana peoples of Mali dance in rites related to the agricultural cycle, they wear headdresses called ci wara (or tji wara). The graceful, elongated lines of the wooden forms evoke parent-and-child antelope pairings—or, sometimes, aardvarks, or armored pangolins. Willie Cole pays homage to the genre in Next Kent tji wara, a 2007 sculpture made out of bicycle parts. From “Reconfiguring an African Icon,” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, Hortense and William A. Mohr Sculpture Purchase Fund, 2008

Antelope Play: 

When the Bamana peoples of Mali dance in rites related to the agricultural cycle, they wear headdresses called ci wara (or tji wara). The graceful, elongated lines of the wooden forms evoke parent-and-child antelope pairings—or, sometimes, aardvarks, or armored pangolins. Willie Cole pays homage to the genre in Next Kent tji wara, a 2007 sculpture made out of bicycle parts. From “Reconfiguring an African Icon,” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Metropolitan Museum of Art, Hortense and William A. Mohr Sculpture Purchase Fund, 2008

Loading...