letmypeopleshow:

Funny, I Do Look Jewish:
I spend most of my time creating editorial content for ARTnews, where I am executive editor. But on October 22 I’m speaking at the Washington DC JCC about my career covering Jewish art—for the Forward, where I was arts editor, and now Tablet magazine, where I am galleries columnist. But what is Jewish art anyway? Defining that term is at once academic exercise and parlor game, a process that inevitably reveals more about the person doing the deciding than it does about the artist in question.
Is it the Impressionism of Pissarro; the haunting paintings of Ross Bleckner, who once told me he’s “Talmudic”; Tami Ben Tor’s provocative Women Talk About Adolf Hitler video; the confessional women’s graphic novels now at Yeshiva University Museum; or Adi Nes’s staged photographs re-enacting Jewish and Christian  biblical scenes in contemporary settings—or the heal-the-world ecological activism of Mierle Ukeles, the official artist of New York’s Sanitation Department? These artists, along with Chagall, Kitaj, Jack Levine, Max Liebermann, Man Ray, Gustav Metzger, Charlotte Salomon, Eva Hesse, Michal Rovner, Yael Bartana, Sigalit Landau, Komar & Melamid, and a host of others past and present will show up in my wide-ranging presentation. 
Reservations are encouraged. So if you want more information, please click here.
Adi Nes, Untitled, 1995. Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

letmypeopleshow:

Funny, I Do Look Jewish:

I spend most of my time creating editorial content for ARTnews, where I am executive editor. But on October 22 I’m speaking at the Washington DC JCC about my career covering Jewish art—for the Forward, where I was arts editor, and now Tablet magazine, where I am galleries columnist. But what is Jewish art anyway? Defining that term is at once academic exercise and parlor game, a process that inevitably reveals more about the person doing the deciding than it does about the artist in question.

Is it the Impressionism of Pissarro; the haunting paintings of Ross Bleckner, who once told me he’s “Talmudic”; Tami Ben Tor’s provocative Women Talk About Adolf Hitler video; the confessional women’s graphic novels now at Yeshiva University Museum; or Adi Nes’s staged photographs re-enacting Jewish and Christian biblical scenes in contemporary settings—or the heal-the-world ecological activism of Mierle Ukeles, the official artist of New York’s Sanitation Department? These artists, along with Chagall, Kitaj, Jack Levine, Max Liebermann, Man Ray, Gustav Metzger, Charlotte Salomon, Eva Hesse, Michal Rovner, Yael Bartana, Sigalit Landau, Komar & Melamid, and a host of others past and present will show up in my wide-ranging presentation. 

Reservations are encouraged. So if you want more information, please click here.

Adi Nes, Untitled, 1995. Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

(Source: letmypeopleshow)

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letmypeopleshow:

Funny, he does look Jewish:
Like so many other aspects of his life and work, Rembrandt’s connection to the Jews has been  sentimentalized, overestimated, misappropriated, criticized,  dissected—and debunked. In recent years, the image of the artist as a  philo-Semite who painted and socialized with his Jewish neighbors has  become a topic of intense scholarly debate. Yet the notion that there’s  something crypto-Jewish about Rembrandt continues to enthrall.
But maybe the Jews in the Rembrandt’s art are hidden in plain sight,  clearly visible in depictions of his favorite Jewish protagonist of all.  That’s the thesis of “Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus,” a provocative exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In the catalog, curator Lloyd DeWitt suggests that the model for a series of seven heads of Christ—studies DeWitt believes Rembrandt used for  several major religious paintings—was a Jew. While DeWitt is not the  first to identify a Jewish Jesus in Rembrandt’s work or in this  particular series of paintings, the show is the first to unite all seven  since 1656 and the most ambitious effort to view them in the larger  context of the artist’s religious work. In addition to being the  largest-ever gathering of paintings of Rembrandt’s Jesus, the show is  also the largest gathering of Rembrandt’s Jews.
That is, if you agree with DeWitt’s thesis about the ethnicity of the  figure in these studies, a theory for which he has no documentary  proof…At that particular place and time in the artist’s career, DeWitt   reasons, Rembrandt is likely to have searched out a sitter with same   physiognomy as his savior—namely, a Jew—in his quest to make the most   naturalistic, humble Jesus to date in the history of art…
Read more in Tablet:
Head of Christ, attributed to Rembrandt and his studio, ca. 1648-56. Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art.

letmypeopleshow:

Funny, he does look Jewish:

Like so many other aspects of his life and work, Rembrandt’s connection to the Jews has been sentimentalized, overestimated, misappropriated, criticized, dissected—and debunked. In recent years, the image of the artist as a philo-Semite who painted and socialized with his Jewish neighbors has become a topic of intense scholarly debate. Yet the notion that there’s something crypto-Jewish about Rembrandt continues to enthrall.

But maybe the Jews in the Rembrandt’s art are hidden in plain sight, clearly visible in depictions of his favorite Jewish protagonist of all. That’s the thesis of “Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus,” a provocative exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In the catalog, curator Lloyd DeWitt suggests that the model for a series of seven heads of Christ—studies DeWitt believes Rembrandt used for several major religious paintings—was a Jew. While DeWitt is not the first to identify a Jewish Jesus in Rembrandt’s work or in this particular series of paintings, the show is the first to unite all seven since 1656 and the most ambitious effort to view them in the larger context of the artist’s religious work. In addition to being the largest-ever gathering of paintings of Rembrandt’s Jesus, the show is also the largest gathering of Rembrandt’s Jews.

That is, if you agree with DeWitt’s thesis about the ethnicity of the figure in these studies, a theory for which he has no documentary proof…At that particular place and time in the artist’s career, DeWitt reasons, Rembrandt is likely to have searched out a sitter with same physiognomy as his savior—namely, a Jew—in his quest to make the most naturalistic, humble Jesus to date in the history of art…

Read more in Tablet:

Head of Christ, attributed to Rembrandt and his studio, ca. 1648-56. Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art.

(Source: letmypeopleshow)

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letmypeopleshow:

Funny, you do look Jewish: 
One day in the early 1990s, Barry Ragone, a Miami Beach dentist,  spotted a wood panel in an auction-house storeroom in Fort Lauderdale.  It had Hebrew writing on it, and it looked old. He bought it for $37.50.  After years of research, Ragone discovered that it was a lot older than  he’d thought—a thousand years old, give or take. According to experts  in medieval Jewish art, it was originally the door to a Torah ark in  Cairo’s Ben Ezra synagogue, where Maimonides prayed and the Geniza was housed.
At first, Ragone wanted the door to be in a Jewish institution. But  after speaking with Gary Vikan, director of Baltimore’s Walters Art  Museum, he changed his mind. He liked Vikan’s concept of a medieval-art  gallery where Christian, Jewish, and Islamic art are commingled, showing  how the cultures overlapped. And he liked the idea of a portal linking  the Jewish community to the museum. For a sum that was less than half of  the $1 million he believed the panel to be worth, he partially sold, partially donated it to the Walters,  which acquired it in partnership with Yeshiva University Museum. The  object will be featured in a show about Jewish life in medieval Egypt  opening at the Walters in fall 2012 and later traveling to YUM.  
The Walters is one of a number of mainstream museums that are intensifying efforts to incorporate Jewish ritual objects—everything from ancient ceremonial silver to cutting-edge Hanukah lamps— into exhibitions, collections, and programming. Read more in my story “Out of the Ghetto,” today on tabletmag.com.

letmypeopleshow:

Funny, you do look Jewish: 

One day in the early 1990s, Barry Ragone, a Miami Beach dentist, spotted a wood panel in an auction-house storeroom in Fort Lauderdale. It had Hebrew writing on it, and it looked old. He bought it for $37.50. After years of research, Ragone discovered that it was a lot older than he’d thought—a thousand years old, give or take. According to experts in medieval Jewish art, it was originally the door to a Torah ark in Cairo’s Ben Ezra synagogue, where Maimonides prayed and the Geniza was housed.

At first, Ragone wanted the door to be in a Jewish institution. But after speaking with Gary Vikan, director of Baltimore’s Walters Art Museum, he changed his mind. He liked Vikan’s concept of a medieval-art gallery where Christian, Jewish, and Islamic art are commingled, showing how the cultures overlapped. And he liked the idea of a portal linking the Jewish community to the museum. For a sum that was less than half of the $1 million he believed the panel to be worth, he partially sold, partially donated it to the Walters, which acquired it in partnership with Yeshiva University Museum. The object will be featured in a show about Jewish life in medieval Egypt opening at the Walters in fall 2012 and later traveling to YUM.  

The Walters is one of a number of mainstream museums that are intensifying efforts to incorporate Jewish ritual objects—everything from ancient ceremonial silver to cutting-edge Hanukah lamps— into exhibitions, collections, and programming. Read more in my story “Out of the Ghetto,” today on tabletmag.com.

(Source: letmypeopleshow)

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