letmypeopleshow:


You cast a spell on me: Resin cast of alphabet-soup pot by Nathaniel Robinson at Feature

letmypeopleshow:

You cast a spell on me: Resin cast of alphabet-soup pot by Nathaniel Robinson at Feature

(Source: letmypeopleshow)

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letmypeopleshow:

Grand Illusions: 
Untitled (Feathered Train), ca. 1952-53, by Martín Ramírez. The Mexican American artist, diagnozed as as a catatonic schizophrenic, spent much of his life confined in California mental institutions, where he produced hundreds of mesmerizing, undulating, mind-blowing drawings and collages in which, as Roberta Smith memorabily put it, “he played spatial illusion as if it were an accordion.” If you see one show in New York this month, make it this rare survey of his incredible landscapes at Ricco Maresca in Chelsea. 
Copyright  the Estate of Martin Ramirez. Image courtesy of Ricco/Maresca Gallery,  NYC.

letmypeopleshow:

Grand Illusions: 

Untitled (Feathered Train), ca. 1952-53, by Martín Ramírez. The Mexican American artist, diagnozed as as a catatonic schizophrenic, spent much of his life confined in California mental institutions, where he produced hundreds of mesmerizing, undulating, mind-blowing drawings and collages in which, as Roberta Smith memorabily put it, “he played spatial illusion as if it were an accordion.” If you see one show in New York this month, make it this rare survey of his incredible landscapes at Ricco Maresca in Chelsea

Copyright the Estate of Martin Ramirez. Image courtesy of Ricco/Maresca Gallery, NYC.

(Source: letmypeopleshow)

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letmypeopleshow:

Funny, he does look Jewish:
Like so many other aspects of his life and work, Rembrandt’s connection to the Jews has been  sentimentalized, overestimated, misappropriated, criticized,  dissected—and debunked. In recent years, the image of the artist as a  philo-Semite who painted and socialized with his Jewish neighbors has  become a topic of intense scholarly debate. Yet the notion that there’s  something crypto-Jewish about Rembrandt continues to enthrall.
But maybe the Jews in the Rembrandt’s art are hidden in plain sight,  clearly visible in depictions of his favorite Jewish protagonist of all.  That’s the thesis of “Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus,” a provocative exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In the catalog, curator Lloyd DeWitt suggests that the model for a series of seven heads of Christ—studies DeWitt believes Rembrandt used for  several major religious paintings—was a Jew. While DeWitt is not the  first to identify a Jewish Jesus in Rembrandt’s work or in this  particular series of paintings, the show is the first to unite all seven  since 1656 and the most ambitious effort to view them in the larger  context of the artist’s religious work. In addition to being the  largest-ever gathering of paintings of Rembrandt’s Jesus, the show is  also the largest gathering of Rembrandt’s Jews.
That is, if you agree with DeWitt’s thesis about the ethnicity of the  figure in these studies, a theory for which he has no documentary  proof…At that particular place and time in the artist’s career, DeWitt   reasons, Rembrandt is likely to have searched out a sitter with same   physiognomy as his savior—namely, a Jew—in his quest to make the most   naturalistic, humble Jesus to date in the history of art…
Read more in Tablet:
Head of Christ, attributed to Rembrandt and his studio, ca. 1648-56. Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art.

letmypeopleshow:

Funny, he does look Jewish:

Like so many other aspects of his life and work, Rembrandt’s connection to the Jews has been sentimentalized, overestimated, misappropriated, criticized, dissected—and debunked. In recent years, the image of the artist as a philo-Semite who painted and socialized with his Jewish neighbors has become a topic of intense scholarly debate. Yet the notion that there’s something crypto-Jewish about Rembrandt continues to enthrall.

But maybe the Jews in the Rembrandt’s art are hidden in plain sight, clearly visible in depictions of his favorite Jewish protagonist of all. That’s the thesis of “Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus,” a provocative exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In the catalog, curator Lloyd DeWitt suggests that the model for a series of seven heads of Christ—studies DeWitt believes Rembrandt used for several major religious paintings—was a Jew. While DeWitt is not the first to identify a Jewish Jesus in Rembrandt’s work or in this particular series of paintings, the show is the first to unite all seven since 1656 and the most ambitious effort to view them in the larger context of the artist’s religious work. In addition to being the largest-ever gathering of paintings of Rembrandt’s Jesus, the show is also the largest gathering of Rembrandt’s Jews.

That is, if you agree with DeWitt’s thesis about the ethnicity of the figure in these studies, a theory for which he has no documentary proof…At that particular place and time in the artist’s career, DeWitt reasons, Rembrandt is likely to have searched out a sitter with same physiognomy as his savior—namely, a Jew—in his quest to make the most naturalistic, humble Jesus to date in the history of art…

Read more in Tablet:

Head of Christ, attributed to Rembrandt and his studio, ca. 1648-56. Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art.

(Source: letmypeopleshow)

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It’s Ruff in the Mosh Pit:
Dan Witz, Dogs Diptych, 2003, oil and mixed media on canvas. From his show “Mosh Pits, Human and Otherwise,” opening at Jonathan LeVine Gallery June 30. The artist, famous for hyperrealistic street art, made the works in the show by combining Old Master painting techniques with digital technologies like Photoshop.

It’s Ruff in the Mosh Pit:

Dan Witz, Dogs Diptych, 2003, oil and mixed media on canvas. From his show “Mosh Pits, Human and Otherwise,” opening at Jonathan LeVine Gallery June 30. The artist, famous for hyperrealistic street art, made the works in the show by combining Old Master painting techniques with digital technologies like Photoshop.

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letmypeopleshow:

Disappearing Act:One sure way to get lots of attention is by vanishing. That was the case of Chinese artist Liu Bolin, who, in a performative act of appropriation, homage, and tagging, camouflaged himself into the Kenny Scharf mural at Houston and Bowery this week. The painting on painting was staged by Wooster Collective and dealer Eli Klein.

letmypeopleshow:

Disappearing Act:
One sure way to get lots of attention is by vanishing. That was the case of Chinese artist Liu Bolin, who, in a performative act of appropriation, homage, and tagging, camouflaged himself into the Kenny Scharf mural at Houston and Bowery this week. The painting on painting was staged by Wooster Collective and dealer Eli Klein.

(Source: letmypeopleshow)

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Lady Gaga: Surf ‘n Turf
Niborama was amused to find a New York Times blog post on Opening Ceremony’s Mondrian-inspired Pret a Surf swimwear. Partly because Nibs has been known to hit the waves herself and she’s always searching for gear that isn’t going to make her look more kooky than she does already (not sure a Mondrian rash guard would help in this department). Second because, how did Mondrian turn into the next big thing? I mean, we know Yves Saint Laurent made that fab Mondrian dress in the ’60s, which Lady Gaga goes gaga over in her inaugural V magazine column. But then she uses the Dutch abstractionist as the touchstone for modernist inspiration throughout the last century. “…Picasso was Matisse’s Mondrian, and vice versa,” she writes. “Bowie is often my Mondrian, as are Michael Jackson, Prince, Lita Ford, and Madonna. Mugler is my silhouette’s Mondrian, Cindy Crawford is my sexuality’s, Kermit is my whimsy’s, and, in my ‘Born This Way’ Video, two of my Mondrians were Francis Bacon and Salvador Dalí…” On she goes, through the course of art history (though it seems she might be using a Jansons from the ’60s, before there were any women artists in it.) We like Mondrian as much as the next gal—or at least Sherrie Levine. And we know Gaga’s stance on performance art, as Jon Pareles just reminded us. So maybe it’s time to get a new textbook—and to start living off the grid?

Lady Gaga: Surf ‘n Turf

Niborama was amused to find a New York Times blog post on Opening Ceremony’s Mondrian-inspired Pret a Surf swimwear. Partly because Nibs has been known to hit the waves herself and she’s always searching for gear that isn’t going to make her look more kooky than she does already (not sure a Mondrian rash guard would help in this department). Second because, how did Mondrian turn into the next big thing? I mean, we know Yves Saint Laurent made that fab Mondrian dress in the ’60s, which Lady Gaga goes gaga over in her inaugural V magazine column. But then she uses the Dutch abstractionist as the touchstone for modernist inspiration throughout the last century. “…Picasso was Matisse’s Mondrian, and vice versa,” she writes. “Bowie is often my Mondrian, as are Michael Jackson, Prince, Lita Ford, and Madonna. Mugler is my silhouette’s Mondrian, Cindy Crawford is my sexuality’s, Kermit is my whimsy’s, and, in my ‘Born This Way’ Video, two of my Mondrians were Francis Bacon and Salvador Dalí…” On she goes, through the course of art history (though it seems she might be using a Jansons from the ’60s, before there were any women artists in it.) We like Mondrian as much as the next gal—or at least Sherrie Levine. And we know Gaga’s stance on performance art, as Jon Pareles just reminded us. So maybe it’s time to get a new textbook—and to start living off the grid?

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Ewe are Great Artists:
I saw a spider crawling around a David Nyzio sculpture at Postmasters the other day, so I wondered if word had gotten out in the animal community that this show features art made in collaboration with beavers and sheep. Maybe Nyzio, who has used insects to make it art in the past, has a following among bugs already, although his iridescent collages of butterfly wings would probably creep them out. 
No animals were harmed in the making of this show, it would seem, though it’s possible that the beavers were upset when Nyzio removed the wood they had so efficiently gnawed before they got to put it to use in their dam. He added steel to it, transforming it into a Brancusian arc. 
In the center of the gallery are bizarrely formed salt forms that look like a cross between dinosaur teeth and stalagmites. The sheep did the licking, and Nyzio did the picking. 
The show, which also includes a series of mysterious works made with coal, is up through May 21.

Ewe are Great Artists:

I saw a spider crawling around a David Nyzio sculpture at Postmasters the other day, so I wondered if word had gotten out in the animal community that this show features art made in collaboration with beavers and sheep. Maybe Nyzio, who has used insects to make it art in the past, has a following among bugs already, although his iridescent collages of butterfly wings would probably creep them out.

No animals were harmed in the making of this show, it would seem, though it’s possible that the beavers were upset when Nyzio removed the wood they had so efficiently gnawed before they got to put it to use in their dam. He added steel to it, transforming it into a Brancusian arc.

In the center of the gallery are bizarrely formed salt forms that look like a cross between dinosaur teeth and stalagmites. The sheep did the licking, and Nyzio did the picking.

The show, which also includes a series of mysterious works made with coal, is up through May 21.

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If Duchamp Had Been on Craigslist:
From The Estate of Rochelle F., by Rochelle Feinstein, at On Stellar Rays on Orchard Street.

If Duchamp Had Been on Craigslist:

From The Estate of Rochelle F., by Rochelle Feinstein, at On Stellar Rays on Orchard Street.

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The Cook, the Artist, his Wife, and Marina:
So old acquaintance be not forgot, go to Park Avenue Spring and ask for Plus One. The waiter at the upscale eatery will bring you a culinary artwork created by Paul Ramirez Jonas—the impish conceptualist who sent us scurrying across town a city-wide scavenger hunt—in collaboration with executive chef Kevin Lasko. 
The piece, with echoes of symbols from Easter as well as Passover, is an ecumenical homage to absent loved ones. It comes with a small glass of  red tonic (beets, sugar, water, rose syrup, yuzu juice) and an amuse-bouche (a picked egg garnished with crème fresh, horseradish, caviar, taro root, and dill). As the meal progresses, the liquid drips from a rectified wine glass onto a bed of eggshells, which gradually assume its hue.  
The price, $5, goes to the public-art group Creative Time, which has staged four artists’ collaborations to change with the restaurant’s seasonal menu. For Lasko’s first partner, Marina Abramovic, he devised Volcano Flambé, a dessert infused with aphrodisiacs and real gold. In the fall he’ll work with Ramirez’s wife, Janine Antoni, who famously gnawed on soap and chocolate for her 1993 piece Lick and Lather. Then comes Michael Rakowitz, who teaches Baghdadi recipes to public audiences as part of Enemy Kitchen. Devising a recipe that fulfils the artist’s conceptual vision is the first challenge, Lasko says. Only then does he worry about making it taste good. But it always does. 

The Cook, the Artist, his Wife, and Marina:

So old acquaintance be not forgot, go to Park Avenue Spring and ask for Plus One. The waiter at the upscale eatery will bring you a culinary artwork created by Paul Ramirez Jonas—the impish conceptualist who sent us scurrying across town a city-wide scavenger hunt—in collaboration with executive chef Kevin Lasko.

The piece, with echoes of symbols from Easter as well as Passover, is an ecumenical homage to absent loved ones. It comes with a small glass of  red tonic (beets, sugar, water, rose syrup, yuzu juice) and an amuse-bouche (a picked egg garnished with crème fresh, horseradish, caviar, taro root, and dill). As the meal progresses, the liquid drips from a rectified wine glass onto a bed of eggshells, which gradually assume its hue. 

The price, $5, goes to the public-art group Creative Time, which has staged four artists’ collaborations to change with the restaurant’s seasonal menu. For Lasko’s first partner, Marina Abramovic, he devised Volcano Flambé, a dessert infused with aphrodisiacs and real gold. In the fall he’ll work with Ramirez’s wife, Janine Antoni, who famously gnawed on soap and chocolate for her 1993 piece Lick and Lather. Then comes Michael Rakowitz, who teaches Baghdadi recipes to public audiences as part of Enemy Kitchen. Devising a recipe that fulfils the artist’s conceptual vision is the first challenge, Lasko says. Only then does he worry about making it taste good. But it always does. 

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